Configure Red Hat Enterprise Linux to receive event logs

Set up a Syslog on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 or 7

The following steps describe how to configure rsyslog on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 or 7 to receive logs from Workload Security.

  1. Log in as root.
  2. Execute:
    vi /etc/rsyslog.conf
  3. Uncomment the following lines near the top of the rsyslog.conf to change them from:
    #$ModLoad imudp
    #$UDPServerRun 514

    #$ModLoad imtcp
    #$InputTCPServerRun 514

    to

    $ModLoad imudp
    $UDPServerRun 514

    $ModLoad imtcp
    $InputTCPServerRun 514

  4. Add the following two lines of text to the end of the rsyslog.conf:
    • #Save Manager logs to DSM.log
    • Local4.* /var/log/DSM.log
    You may need to replace Local4 with another value, depending on your Workload Security settings.
  5. Save the file and exit.
  6. Create the /var/log/DSM.log file by typing touch /var/log/DSM.log.
  7. Set the permissions on the DSM log so that syslog can write to it.
  8. Save the file and exit.
  9. Restart syslog:
    • On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6: service rsyslog restart
    • On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7: systemctl restart rsyslog

When Syslog is functioning you will see logs populated in: /var/log/DSM.log

Set up a Syslog on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

The following steps describe how to configure Syslog on Red Hat Enterprise Linux to receive logs from Workload Security.

  1. Log in as root.
  2. Execute:
    vi /etc/syslog.conf
  3. Add the following two lines of text to the end of the syslog.conf :
    • #Save Manager logs to DSM.log
    • Local4.* /var/log/DSM.log
    You may need to replace Local4 with another value, depending on your Workload Security settings.
  4. Save the file and exit.
  5. Create the /var/log/DSM.log file by typing touch /var/log/DSM.log.
  6. Set the permissions on the DSM log so that syslog can write to it.
  7. Execute:
    vi /etc/sysconfig/syslog
  8. Modify the line " SYSLOGD_OPTIONS " and add a " -r " to the options.
  9. Save the file and exit.
  10. Restart syslog: /etc/init.d/syslog restart

When Syslog is functioning you will see logs populated in: /var/log/DSM.log